Harassment Prevention Training. Order it Here.

EEOC Announces New Resources for Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity Workplace Rights

EverythingHR Staff | 06/16/2021 | Blog, Featured

In a June 15 press release, the EEOC announced new resources about sexual orientation and gender identity workplace rights. Here is the text of the press release:

The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) is observing LGBTQ+ Pride Month, and the anniversary of the U.S. Supreme Court ruling in Bostock v. Clayton County, by announcing the release of new resources to educate employees, applicants and employers about the rights of all employees, including lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender workers, to be free from sexual orientation and gender identity discrimination in employment. The materials include a new landing page on the EEOC website that consolidates information concerning sexual orientation and gender identity discrimination and a new technical assistance document to help the public understand the Bostock decision and established EEOC positions on the laws the agency enforces.

The new landing page consolidates information the public needs to know about the scope of protections against discrimination based on sexual orientation and gender identity, as well as information about harassment, retaliation and how to file a charge of discrimination with the EEOC.  Additionally, there are links to EEOC statistics and updated fact sheets concerning recent EEOC litigation and federal sector decisions regarding sexual orientation and gender identity discrimination.

“All people, regardless of sexual orientation and gender identity, deserve an opportunity to work in an environment free from harassment or other discrimination,” EEOC Chair Charlotte A. Burrows said. “The Supreme Court’s decision in Bostock v. Clayton County is a historic milestone that resulted from the struggle, sacrifice, and vision of many brave LGBTQ+ individuals and allies who had championed civil rights for the LGBTQ+ communities. The new information will make it easier for people to understand their rights and responsibilities related to discrimination based on sexual orientation and gender identity.”

These materials are part of EEOC’s effort to ensure that the public can find accessible, plain language materials in a convenient location on EEOC’s website.  Neither the new landing page nor the new technical assistance document, titled “Protections Against Employment Discrimination Based on Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity” state new EEOC policy; rather, these resources rely on previously voted positions adopted by the Commission.  The technical assistance document:

  • Explains the significance of the Bostock ruling;
  • Compiles in one location information about sexual orientation and gender identity discrimination;
  • Consistent with Bostock, reiterates the EEOC’s established positions on basic Title VII concepts, rights, and responsibilities as they pertain to discrimination based on sexual orientation and gender identity; and
  • Provides information about the EEOC’s role in enforcing Title VII and protecting employees’ civil rights.

The EEOC advances opportunity in the workplace by enforcing federal laws prohibiting employment discrimination. More information is available at www.eeoc.gov.